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theacademy:

Nicole Kidman through the years

asylum-art:

Phil Hale illustrations

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Phil Hale, a London based illustrator, knows what to do. His illustrations are incredibly rich with disjointed movement, explosive energy, and raw masculinity that which all combines into an overwhelming visit to drama itself.
Hale‘s caught-in-the-moment subjects in contexts that can be described as a bit dark reminded me of the time I fell in love with J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye. In my fantasy world, Hale and Salinger would be exchanging ideas for a collaborative project to illustrate Catcher over a casual dinner (Salinger making sure the plot in the book is followed), where I would join them for the meal as a mutual acquaintance they don’t mind having around, share a few laughs with the fellows, and silently admire them both while watching them talk. 


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asylum-art:

Crystal Liu

“the moon,” a new series of drawings from crystal liu.

"like all of her work, these use nature as metaphor to explore human emotion.   her inconography of trees, water, rocks, mountains, clouds and the stars and moon recount stories, or maybe it’d be more accurate to say open-ended fables.   because even after you’ve deciphered her symbolic language, it’s never really certain what’s going on.

of course, that’s what makes them interesting…   every viewer brings their own interpretation based on their experience (and issues).  think of them as psychological landscapes.  or representational rorschachs.

is the tree supporting the moon here?  a gentle caress? a tender embrace?   or is the moon pushing the tree around?  bullying.  holding it down.  turning it into a bent thing… incapable of reaching its potential?

is the moon an obligation?  a burden?  you know the expression, “the weight of the world on your shoulders.”

perhaps the moon is illuminating the reflection of the birch…  the lamp in a portrait of self-evaluation.  trees, in liu’s vocabulary, certainly represent people…   bundles of secret hopes, insecurities and longings.

and as is always the case, when there are more personalities involved, things gets more complicated.

reflections, crystal says, might actually be another place.  otherworldly.  an alternate reality.  perhaps a dream.   are the two trees sharing the same dream?   joseph conrad’s the secret sharer comes to mind…

or are they jousting?    now i’m thinking of the stories of male elk who lock horns over a potential mate…  then starve to death when they can’t break free.

“the moon was so beautiful, that the ocean held up a mirror.”    — ani difranco, everest, track 6 on up, up, up

in this series, there’s a sense of reaching…   of striving toward something.  i think maybe they’re about an attempt find the unattainable.  or maybe they’re about something else entirely.”

 each work is made of watercolor, gouache, ink and gold leaf on paper and is 15 inches square.

Crystal Liu was the Gold Medal Award winner at Ontario College of Art and Design when she graduated with her BFA in 2003. She completed her MFA at the San Francisco Art Institute in 2005. Her photos hail from cities such as Toronto, San Francisco, Chicago and Glasgow. Landscapes float up into view with a delicate touch more akin to painting than photography. Their vastness and freedom allow viewers to surrender, re-imagine, or re-create them as personal reverie or memory. In the summer of 2005 she joined the Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco.

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asylum-art:

Berlinde De Bruyckere.:Suffering and Protection
Flemish sculptor creates sculptures and drawings of suffering human bodies that resemble nothing so much as reality. It mixes in his sculptures on religious grounds and media images and writes the Christian motif of the human suffering in the contemporary era. The confrontation with the body that engages the artist led to questions about the ethics of our society and are the place to fundamental questions about the nature of the human being.
These disturbing and uncannily lifelike sculptures by Belgian artist Berlinde De Bruyckere are incredibly visceral and eerie. The repulsion instinctively triggered in the viewer comes from their verisimilitude, and the sense of reality of this nameless, grotesque, distorted, half-human, seemingly fluid flesh; combined with their beauty, the delicate, subtle mottling of colors, the pure realistic visceral fleshiness of the works, and their technical grace.

asylum-art:

Isaac Cordal - Cement Eclipses. Chiapas, Mexico. 2013

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Isaac Cordal was in Mexico last year where he could give some new perspectives to his project Cement Eclipses. The Spanish artists so get inspired by the local folklore to stage his miniature sculptures in the streets of cities and villages located in Chiapas. Next to this, he also collaborated with young students of the Escuelita Zapatista. Together, they collected clay from the paths of the country and shaped some figurine then leaved to their own destiny. Here after, you’ll find pictures taken back from his South-American trip by Isaac. Lastly, let’s remind a book bringing together photographs of the installations he made last year in Nantes has been published. You’ll find it on Lalibrairie.com.

asylum-art:

Incredible Micro Art Onto Food by Hasan Kale

From a single pumpkin seed to delicate butterfly wings, no canvas is too teeny for micro artist Hasan Kale. The talented — not to mention patient — artist paints realistic renderings of his hometown of Istanbul on unexpected objects.

Kale’s unique oeuvre sets the artist apart from other miniature mavens dealing in more traditional canvases.

asylum-art:

Nonsense Sculptures  by Seyo Cizmic